NO WATER…AGAIN! Will This Emergency Gravity Fed Water System Work?

This is a water emergency! It is mid-summer and we have no water on our off grid homestead! Follow along as we trouble-shoot the problem and attempt to rig up a temporary gravity fed water system. Will it work?!

RESOURCES:
Seaflo 12v 55psi Water Pump: https://amzn.to/2tsfFh0

High Pressure Braided PVC Water Hose Tubing: https://amzn.to/2MWWjIX

RELATED VIDEOS:

Our OTHER Off-Grid Water Emergency: https://goo.gl/YA6zrZ

Off Grid Bucket Bath and Laundry: https://youtu.be/h8dOoAvtccw

What is That Crazy Contraption Over Our Water Pump?: https://youtu.be/nuJEXVHkojA

4 Comments

  1. Belva Dalidowich

    June 27, 2018 at 4:48 pm

    OMG so much work. You two are Amazing. I know I could never survive it. But Kudos to you both.

  2. You might consider a 240 volt pump for your well. Then you could continue to use the wire already installed. I think your inverter does 240 volts. I really enjoy your youtube videos. They look great you do a good job on those.

  3. Whoa Nellie. You have to seriously need to consider what to do if your spring dries up entirely, through the summer. Mine does.

    The first thing that I would investigate is if your helpful neighbors have an unmetered municipal water supply. If it’s a matter of running 1/4 mile of cheap piping to your pressure tank, that may be your best option. You’ll only need to rely on their water in the heat of the summer. If that ain’t happening, do everything that you can to collect rainwater. We have 6 of those 250 gallon totes. (Food grade. The ones surrounded by caging. You can get them around here for$50/ea.) One is under the chicken coop, one under the pole barn, one at the hunting cabin, and two at the house. We cut 4″ solid drain tile in half, and used fence wire and eye hooks to hold the “gutters” in place, slightly angled. Then an uncut piece funnels the water into the tanks. In a good rainer, we can fill every tank. That’s 1025 gals. (One of the tanks stays in our farm truck.) Then, as we need, we can we can use a small sump pump to pump the collected rain water into the tank into the truck. Drive it to the spring and let gravity “filler up”. I covered the tanks with opaque white plastic. I have had zero algae. They also have a valve built into the bottom.

    One thing we also purchased was a tank from tractor supply that is the size of a queen mattress set. It holds about 400 gallons, and is in our basement. I live in northern Vermont, and while we have never been critically low in the winter….I have too many animal mouths to deal with. Always having that 400 gallons that can supply the pressure tank to the whole house is reassuring.

    Long winded, but hoping to be helpful.

  4. I surely understand your struggle with water. My advice would be to collect rain water at every opportunity, from whatever roof area you have avaiable. We have those 250 gal. totes, the ones in the metal caging. Food grade, they cost $35 ea. One collects water from the house. One collects water from our hunting camp, and one collects water from the barn. One lives in the truck. We move the captured water it into the tote in the truck with a very small hp sump pump. From there, it goes into the tank in the basement, via gravity. That one was a little more difficult. To get that into the basement took complete stairway demo, and more than a few fingers crossed. We were able to easily connect that giant tank to the pressure tank that supplies the whole house. Good luck. Hang in. I’ve been doing this homesteading crap since 1979. One thing that I will advise you, is that it doesn’t get easier. Getting electricity would be the first thing that I would do. Do it secretly, underground. So as your truck dies, and your 2000 Kia is stuck in the driveway, 1/2 mile away, with the 10 gallons of gas for the generator in two feet of snow……while your husband is working night shift plus overtime…..You might really love flipping a switch. We’re still doing exclusively wood heat, but I see that changing as soon as the social security checks start rolling in, and we’re both still working, overtime. Luckily, I am a gardener by trade. My husband is a machinest. Poor husband.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.